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dc.contributorPatricia Hartman, pjh0011@auburn.eduen_US
dc.creatorHartman, Patricia
dc.creatorRoberts, Sharon
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-05T16:28:24Z
dc.date.available2015-09-05T16:28:24Z
dc.date.created2015-04-09
dc.date.issued2015-09-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11200/48525
dc.description.abstractGiven the immediate visual impact of infographics as well as the ease of creating them, infographics are an effective way to communicate complex information. However, viewers of infographics may draw very different conclusions depending on how the data are presented. I worked with a Biology professor to develop two epidemiology-themed information literacy classes on infographics. We had two goals for these sessions: 1) Students would be able to apply evaluative criteria to infographic sources in order to judge accuracy, bias, and quality of infographics; and 2) students would be able to locate appropriate data sources in order to create their own infographics. I will describe the development and outcome of the classes, as well as the benefits to students, faculty member, and librarian.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAlabama Library Association 2015 Conferenceen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivsen_US
dc.titleUsing Infographics to Teach Source Evaluation to Biology Freshmenen_US
dc.typeCollectionen_US
dc.type.genrePresentation, Paper Presentationen_US
dc.description.peerreviewNoen_US
dc.locationPoint Clear, Alabamaen_US


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